The Latest Shark Research

Hello everyone,

First off, I would like to introduce myself to the Spinning To End Finning community out there.  My name is Jay Reti and I am among the newest members of the team.  I am excited to be working with such a passionate and committed group of people to promote such an important global cause.  As a scientific researcher myself, I am going to post occasional blogs about the most recent, important, and fascinating research on sharks, which will remind us all of why shark conservation is so very important. 

About 100 million sharks per year are killed due to fishing and finning.  That’s a staggering number!  The problem, though, is that it is extremely hard to monitor how many sharks are being killed and if conservation efforts are working at all.  Unfortunately for all of us, the latest research shows that there has been no change in the number of sharks killed each year over the last decade.  In 2000, an estimated 100 million sharks were killed; in 2010, the number was the same (97 million sharks).  This research, which comes from the journal Marine Policy (2013, volume 40, page 194), also shows that sharks are not reaching adulthood and that they are not able to reproduce quickly enough to maintain their current population. 

These three facts are dangerous: too many adolescent and adult sharks are killed before they can reproduce…we all know that this is unsustainable and won’t end well if we don’t do anything.  In other words, we need more shark babies (like the bamboo shark embryo in the picture below from http://www.livescience.com).  We have to spread the word of preserving these important animals to enact positive change!

You can help us soon at the Spinning To End Finning benefit concert, “Waves of Change,” at Pomar Junction Winery on May 10.  Check out all of the details at: https://www.facebook.com/events/598926450126072/

Thanks so much to all of you for your support and I look forward to seeing you at the concert!

Conservationally yours,

Dr. Jay

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